Former Duke star Jay Williams says he attempted suicide after accident

Samuel:

This breaks my heart but I am glad he never went through with it. Depression is one thing that a lot people will never understand. I don’t understand it fully but I can understand that depression is a serious thing and at times, people need the right help. It’s tough to open up about it but I hope that this message can reach those who are battling it.

Originally posted on SI Wire:

Jay Williams suffered career-ending injuries in a motorcycle accident a year after he was selected with the No. 2 overall pick in 2002. (Stan Honda/Getty Images)

Jay Williams suffered career-ending injuries in a motorcycle accident a year after he was selected with the No. 2 overall pick in 2002. (Stan Honda/Getty Images)

In a New York Times profile nearly 10 years since a motorcycle accident effectively ended his career, Jay Williams details the emotional and psychological recovery he underwent in the years following the incident for the first time.

Williams, a National Freshman of the Year, NCAA champion and Naismith National Player of the Year for Duke in the early 2000s, told Times reporter Greg Bishop that he struggled with depression, went to the therapy and even attempted suicide.

“I remember lying in my bed,” he said. “And I’m just tired of being here. I didn’t want to be here anymore. I was so afraid to face people. And I didn’t really know who I was. And I didn’t really want anybody to see me. And…

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Power Rankings: A sign of feeble minds trying to make sense of nothing

Useless.

Ever since I got into sports journalism, one thing that has always bothered me was “Power Rankings” in sports. In fact, I tried to understand its purpose and have come to conclusion that it’s one of the most useless things ever.

Unless it’s college football, where rankings actually matter, power rankings serve no purpose. All it is really is the opinion of one or more  people ranking teams on who they think are better than others.

No statistics. No logic. Just opinions.

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