It’s possible that some are overstating the impact of Joe Maddon opting out

Samuel:

I think this is on point. I won’t undervalue Maddon as a manager. Successful managers have success when they have talented players. What makes Maddon great is that he is great with the players and he is well-liked and well-respected. Depending on what talent he inherits and how many resources he can work with, we might be able to see what kind of manager he can be in a different setting.

Originally posted on HardballTalk:

The Joe Maddon opt-out news is obviously a big deal, and talk about him and where he may go is going to dominate the discourse for a while. But I feel like maybe the magnitude of all of this is being a bit overstated this afternoon.

Joe Maddon is a fine manager. I’d hire him in a second if he were available. He is a good tactician. He plays well with his front office but doesn’t just follow their orders. He has shown that he can win with kids and with payroll limitations. And unless I’m forgetting some major incident, he does what I think is the most important thing a manager does in keeping things, generally speaking, on an even keel over the course of a long season. The Rays did well with Maddon and whoever hires him is going to do pretty well too.

But Maddon is not…

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Who should I root for in the World Series?

Couldn’t really do this picture since I don’t own a Giants cap.

I am still sad that my Oakland A’s are no longer in the postseason. But I am still a baseball fan and I care about what happens in this sport. Which leads me to today, Game 1 of the World Series.

Since my team lost to the Royals, naturally I will cheer for the team that eliminated my team. The Royals are exciting and they haven’t had this kind of success since 1985. They play a fun brand of ball and I am an American League guy. I know that team well. They have this really cool fan. I like them. All signs point for me to cheer for the Royals.

On the other hand, the Giants are the Bay Area and I love the city of San Francisco. Any good mojo that comes the Bay Area’s way, is always good. I have no problems with the team. I don’t hate the team like many other A’s fans. I have tons of friends who are Giants fans — with about half of them on the bandwagon — which is annoying. That’s really the only thing I have against the team: all their bandwagon fans.

So who do I root for? Who should I root for? I’m leaning towards the Royals. They are a better storyline. The Giants already had their fun. Let the new team get a slice of the pie. But if it doesn’t, oh well, good for the Giants.

Thank you, Josh Beckett

With Josh Beckett hanging it up, I will like to reminisce about the now former pitcher. Sure, he’s had some moments that were memorable (no-hitter this year) and some not (fried chicken), but the only moment that really holds any value to me is what you see above.

During that time in 2003, I was a still young baseball fan. I had invested time in watching baseball for about five years now and my disdain for the Yankees was at an all-time high.

The 23-year-old on three days rest threw masterpiece. Manager Jack McKeon was asked about saving Beckett for Game 7. He said he didn’t want to wait for Game 7, he wanted to win the World Series now. He gave this young kid the ball on short rest. And he was magnificent.

This performance is one of the biggest moments I can trace back to my foundation of being a baseball fan. It made me remember and believe that even the underdogs can come out on top.

That team was great. Josh Beckett was magnificent. Thank you for being a huge part of my love for the game. I am lucky to have seen him pitch live in person.

A’s fans suggest depressing 2015 promotion ideas on Twitter

Crowd sourcing is good business. It’s great to use when engaging with fans. The only thing that could become an issue is timing.

Take the A’s for example. What they’re asking on Twitter is fine. But doing it a week after their heartbreaking postseason elimination was not a good idea.

Fans responded accordingly.

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I like the one-game Wild Card round for the MLB postseason

Up until last night, I had no opinion of this. My team, for the past two seasons, did not need to play in this round so I never gave it much thought. But this year, this was their only entry into the dance and I started to wonder whether or not this was a fair format.

After watching last night’s thrilling and tough loss, I have to say I am on board with this game.

The initial gripe I had heard was that the addition of an extra Wild Card team would dilute the playoff chase in September. Looking at what we had this season, I still had interest in it. Also, giving two more teams a chance to make the postseason to me is a good move. Open up the gates a little for the other teams.

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I may have unintentionally deceived the Internet with my #RE2PECT tweet

This didn’t happen. I photoshopped it. It was an idea that popped into my head during Derek Jeter’s last home game. There were discussions of how Jeter had a double that helped start the rally to tie the game at 2-2 in the first inning.

The constant talking about his number and the hashtag #RE2PECT gave me an idea. So I awaited the top of the second inning and looked at the pitch count. Then I awaited for the actual possibility of the influx of 2s to appear. It never happened. But I wanted it to happen. With all this talk of 2s and how everyone is praising Jeter for all the wrong reasons, I opened up my Photoshop, grabbed some screenshots from the game, then just made it myself.

I didn’t think much of it. It was a joke. I was so sure that people watching the game would notice that it was fake since the Orioles didn’t get two runners on base in the top of the second inning. But of course, in this day and age of the Internet, people will jump to anything. And look at all those retweets and favorites. That’s a lot! Sorry if I deceived you.

Sorry folks, this didn’t really happen.

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All this Derek Jeter love-fest wouldn’t exist if not for one fact

Earlier, I shared my joys about Derek Jeter. He’s been a consistently good player for most of his career. His final years haven’t been all that, but overall, he’s been a staple in Yankees baseball. I hate the Yankees, but he’s one of few players that I don’t hate. I like him. He’s good for baseball.

Since I live in Southern California, I even made it out to his final game in Anaheim just so I can see him one last time. I wanted to see him play one last time. I even snapped this Hall of Fame photo. I enjoy watching him play.

With that being said, the love-fest he’s gotten all season long is too much. Do we need all this? Do we need everyone showering him with all this love and gifts and ceremonies? The excessive force-feeding of merchandise? Yes, he deserves great praise. But this is going overboard.

Jeter was never among the greatest player of his generation. He never won MVP, never won a batting title. He rarely was ever the top guy in any major statistical categories. He was good and has had memorable postseason moments, but hanging on to those clutch postseason games does not define a two-decade career.

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