Athletics share quote on Instagram with typo

The Athletics just shared the above quote from The Sandlot. It’s a good quote except for one problem: they misspelled “heroes.”

However, if the quote was referring to the delicious sandwich, then it’s not a misspelling. But I don’t think Babe Ruth was talking about sandwiches.

Or maybe he was?

Advertisements

I finally watched “The Fan” and I have some thoughts on the movie

The Fan (1996)

In 1996, a movie called “The Fan” was released. It was about a deranged, obsessive baseball fan who went to crazy lengths to try to “help” his favorite ballplayer succeed. Of course, it wasn’t fandom, but an unhealthy obsession that led to stealing, kidnapping and murder.

I was only eight when this movie came out, so I never got a chance to see the movie. It wasn’t until last night I saw it on Crackle and decided to watch it. The plot of the movie in itself isn’t a bad one. There are plenty of crazy fans that go too far for their team or a favorite player sometimes. This story did go a little extreme, but the premise of this movie isn’t something that is out of the ordinary.

But sadly, that’s where the movie fails. As good as the story was, the storytelling was horrible.

So why do I feel compelled to tell my thoughts on a movie that was released 18 years ago?

Continue reading

My “Million Dollar Arm” movie review

I just got back from seeing “Million Dollar Arm” and this movie was very entertaining with a good amount of comedic pauses. Of course with Disney sports movies, this is what I expect. They know how to tell an uplifting story, take some moments to make it enjoyable and then teach a lesson.

Let me first say that the representation of India was a little harsher than what it actually is. They made it seem that the people there all are very lower class. That’s not actually true. But of course to portray it so we can empathize and make it very Hollywood, that’s what they had to do.

I knew and read about these two Indian prospects when they actually were signed by the Pirates so I was actually really curious about how their story would be portrayed. I never read the book, but if the book is anything similar to what I just watched, it’s a good one.

Continue reading

Bull Durham the Musical Is a Real Thing

I am afraid to look forward to this.

Where Are They Now? – The Sandlot

When my copy of SI comes in, I am reading this!

Inside Sports Illustrated

sandlotTwenty years ago nine kids took to a makeshift diamond to tell a story about baseball and capture the essence of youth in 1962. Two decades later, the actors from The Sandlot have scattered professionally and geographically, but some remain close and all are connected by the same experience and the same iconic line: “You’re killing me Smalls!” SI writer Matt Gagne takes a look at what the actors who played the nine main characters have been up to since the movie came out – from acting and playing poker to saving lives and running a pizza shop.

Patrick Renna – Ham:

Known as the pudgy, freckled-faced kid who spoke the infamous line, “You’re killing me Smalls,” Patrick Renna discusses his post-Sandlot athletic success from mastering slow-pitch softball to earning a hole-in-one during a difficult shot at a California golf course last July. The 34-year-old Renna, who is married…

View original post 1,258 more words

Looking at the bad guys in “42”

Eye-opening piece right here. After watching the movie, it’s good to know a little background about the “villains” in the film.

HardballTalk

Rob Neyer is at his absolute best when he’s writing historically. He has a tremendously large baseball library and, it appears anyway, he either has most of it memorized or at least painstakingly indexed.  Yesterday he used that brain and those tools to put together a great column. The subject: the stories behind the players and coaches in the movie “42” who served as the movie’s villains.

For what it’s worth, the movie got their roles down pretty good as far as these things go. But even though a lot of historical drama amps up the bad guy factor to comical proportions, even with real life figures, Rob notes that the makers of “42” seemed to avoid that for the most part.

Like I said, great stuff. Well, except for the part where he claims that the actor who played Wash in “Firefly” wasn’t handsome. That one just hurt. I…

View original post 5 more words

My movie review of “42” and getting to know Jackie Robinson a little more

I came into the movie theater knowing that I wasn’t going to get a major history lesson of everything that happened during Jackie Robinson’s rookie year. But I knew that with Hollywood, the main message of the story would be told beautifully. That’s what I got when I saw “42” today.

The movie doesn’t detail every single thing that came with Robinson’s signing or Branch Rickey’s struggle to maintain a clubhouse that supported Robinson. But as any good Hollywood movie does, the reality is shown. And the reality was that Robinson’s arrival came with a lot of hate. From hate mail, to racial slurs to death threats, it all was emphasized throughout the film, an important aspect that I think the film captures wonderfully. Especially for a time period that so few of us actually lived through, it’s shocking to see how narrow-minded America was at one point.

I’ll be honest, I shed a tear a few times throughout the film because I think it still hurts to see racism today. Even though it was nothing like it was in the 1940s, the fact that we still struggle to accept people despite differences in our society makes this movie that much more powerful.

Continue reading