I’m going to the Baseball Hall of Fame and Basketball Hall of Fame this weekend

For several years I have been planning a trip back to Cooperstown. I went there in 2008 and wanted to return last year for Frank Thomas. That didn’t work out but this year, I knew I had to make it. I booked everything three months ago and now this weekend I will finally be there.

Just look at that class. Phenomenal! I am a huge Pedro Martinez and Randy Johnson fan. John Smoltz was my favorite pitcher from the Braves trio and Craig Biggio was just nails every time. This was my childhood. This is why I love baseball. It’s going to be crazy flying out to Albany tonight and driving all the way out to Cooperstown. But for the induction ceremony, I have to be there.

Then after all that, I will be driving out to Boston to visit Fenway Park on Tuesday for Pedro’s jersey retirement. That’s my first time ever at Fenway. I am really excited for that.

But before that on Monday, I will head out to the Basketball Hall of Fame. This is going to be real exciting to visit this museum. That just leaves the Hockey Hall of Fame as the last one for me to visit.

This is my weekend. I will share as much as I can on social media. I am really excited for this. I think I might go back next year.

 

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My only gripe with the Baseball Hall of Fame selection today

I wanted five to get in but it was only four. That’s fine. These four are deserving and I will be very excited to see them get in. However, I have one major problem with the results. It’s not even that Mike Piazza did not get in and it wasn’t because several other players I believed deserved entry will not get in.

The voting results is what got to me.

  • Randy Johnson: 97.3 percent
  • Pedro Martinez: 91.1 percent
  • John Smoltz: 82.9 percent
  • Craig Biggio: 82.7 percent
  • Mike Piazza: 69.9 percent
  • Jeff Bagwell: 55.7 percent
  • Tim Raines: 55.0 percent
  • Curt Schilling: 39.2 percent
  • Roger Clemens: 37.5 percent
  • Barry Bonds: 36.8 percent

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My ballot for the Baseball Hall of Fame induction class

With the announcement of the Hall of Fame class coming later today, I am excited to see who will get selected. There could be five that go in, which would be the most since the first ever class in 1936. And I am trying to see if I can get some time off to go to the Hall of Fame this year. Cooperstown is a great place for a baseball nut like me.

But with every Hall of Fame year, we have to start thinking about who is close to getting in and who will be left off.

So to begin, I am giving you my locks for this year and the five I think that will be selected for enshrinement.

Pedro Martinez – Greatest pitcher of our generation and possibly of all time. He pitched in the steroid era and dominated. Plus, he had the greatest relief appearance in postseason history. Enough said.

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Vikings punter Chris Kluwe uses Post-It note to tell Hall of Fame to put Ray Guy in

Chris Kluwe’s form of protest.

For all NFL games this week and next week, teams will wear a 50th anniversary patch for the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

It’s a nice gesture and I think it’s really appropriate to honor the history of the game.

But as you can see from the above picture, Vikings punter Chris Kluwe feels that the Hall of Fame is discrediting Ray Guy.

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Reggie Jackson has beef with the Hall of Fame voting process

Jackson was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.

In this week’s Sports Illustrated, the magazine is doing their annual “Where Are They Now?” series and one of the former athletes they’re featuring is Hall of Fame baseball legend Reggie Jackson.

In the piece, Jackson has some choice words about the current selection process into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

“I didn’t see Kirby Puckett as a Hall of Famer. I didn’t see Gary Carter as a Hall of Famer. I didn’t see Don Sutton as a Hall of Famer. I didn’t see Phil Niekro as a Hall of Famer. As much as I like Jim Rice, I’m not so sure he’s a Hall of Famer.” What about Bert Blyleven? “No. No, no, no, no,” Jackson says. “Blyleven wasn’t even the dominant pitcher of his era — it was Jack Morris.”

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